TRAVERSE CITY: global climate presentation open to all

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2015 – Warmest Global Year on Record (since 1880) – Colors indicate temperature anomalies (NASA/NOAA; 20 January 2016).[64]

Former Grand Rapids Mayor Heartwell, Traverse City leaders to discuss local solutions to global climate challenge Oct. 6

Former Grand Rapids Mayor George Heartwell—who led his city to become the first in the state with a 100% renewable energy goal—will share his experiences from the recent Paris climate talks and discuss how cities can take local action in the fight against global climate change during a public event in Traverse City on Oct. 6.

“The actual work that affects climate happens at the local level,” Heartwell told the Groundwork Center in an interview. “When you are mayor of a city and realize your city is being impacted by climate change, if you are not aggressive, matters will be even worse in decades to come.”

Traverse City Mayor Jim Carruthers will introduce Heartwell, whose remarks will be followed by a panel discussion featuring the two mayors, a local utility official and a leading Michigan expert in clean energy.

What: An evening with George Heartwell, former mayor of Grand Rapids, and local experts and officials to discuss steps communities can take to combat climate change and become more resilient and sustainable. Read more about Heartwell’s accomplishments here.

When: Thursday, Oct. 6 from 7-8:30 p.m.

Where: Central United Methodist Church, 222 S. Cass Street, Traverse City. This event is free and open to the public.

Who:

  • George Heartwell, former mayor of Grand Rapids.
  • Jim Carruthers, mayor of Traverse City.
  • Skip Pruss, principal and co-founder of 5 Lakes Energy and former chief energy officer for the State of Michigan.
  • Rachel Johnson, Member Relations Manager, Cherryland Electric Cooperative.
2015 – Warmest Global Year on Record (since 1880) – Colors indicate temperature anomalies (NASA/NOAA; 20 January 2016).[64]
2015 – Warmest Global Year on Record (since 1880) – Colors indicate temperature anomalies (NASA/NOAA; 20 January 2016).[64]