Boosters, safety, sports changes, and more

Boosters, safety, possible sports conference changes and more topped this month’s school board meeting.
Boyne City Boosters Foundation President Michael Hautz briefs the Board of Education on Booster happenings. (C. Faulknor/BC Gazette/Sept 9, 2013)
Boyne City Boosters Foundation President Michael Hautz briefs the Board of Education on Booster happenings. (C. Faulknor/BC Gazette/Sept 9, 2013)

Boosters, safety, possible sports conference changes and more topped this month’s school board meeting.

A round-up of the Boyne City Public Schools Board of Education meeting, which occurred on Monday Sept. 9, includes the following items of interest:

Boyne City Booster Foundation

 

David Hautz, president of the Boyne City Booster Foundation, told Boyne City Public Schools Board of Education members that the annual Paint The Town Red fundraiser will likely see some changes, including the time of year it occurs.

“What we wanted to do—we would have had it every February every year from now and forever—what Boyne USA has asked us to do, since that’s their peak time, it’s best for us to come another time of year when they’re not at their peak and there’s no disruption of services to the guests who are here to enjoy BOYNE and tourism and skiing and everything else,” he said. “So I’ll keep you apprised as to when we finalize the 2014 date.”

Boyne City Public Schools Board of Education Treasurer Ross McLane attempted to ask Hautz a couple questions about Paint The Town Red—which is a major fundraiser for the Boyne City Booster Foundation—which helps fund trips and supplies for Boyne schools students.

“I’m actually not here to discuss Paint The Town Red,” Hautz said. “If you’d like to come to our first meeting of October.”

McLane attempted again to ask about the event and Hautz said twice more that he was not willing to speak about the event during the school board meeting.

“I’m not here to talk about Paint The Town Red but I wanted to keep you apprised of its dates changing,” Hautz said, adding that the rumors that there would be two Paint The Town Red events yearly was merely a rumor.

Boyne City Public Schools Board of Education Trustee Zareena Koch said she has three children in the Boyne school system and understands the importance of the Boyne Booster Foundation.

“We continue to cut. We don’t have a choice,” Koch said. “We have to cut the budget and these folks are, right now, covering the things that we can’t cover.”

Koch gave the boosters a donation during the meeting and urged other parents and community members to do the same.

 

Ramblers athletics

Boyne City Public Schools Athletic Director David Hills reported on the status of school sports.

“From an athletics standpoint, all sports are into their seasons,” he said. “All the calendars, schedules and that are on the athletics web page. Lots of things happening every week and weekend.”

Maintenance has been done on the track and long jump areas.

During a Lake Michigan Northwest Conference meeting the possibility of merging the two leagues for football only was discussed.

“Basically where we left it was there is a two-week window now where the athletic directors have to clean up the schedule and make sure a number of things brought up at the meeting are addressed,” Hills said. “On the 17th we’re going back down to Traverse City and discussing that again and hopefully coming up with a plan to address all those concerns.”

The purpose of combining the conferences—Lake Michigan and Northwest—would be to improve the current disparity among larger and smaller schools within each by adding more of each into a single conference.

“The schools could play a competition that is closer in size, which helps from a competitive standpoint,” Hills said.

Hills said some of the negatives to such a conglomeration would include longer travel times to schools farther away, potential scheduling conflicts, decrease in revenue from ticket sales, and difficulty with accruing playoff points to name a few.

 

Facility tour

Members of the public and the Boyne City Public Schools Board of Education were given a tour of the newly re-purposed upstairs of the Early Childhood Education Center, which will now be used for the Boyne City Public Schools Alternative Education programs. The facility includes computer labs meant for online learning, a detention room to be used by students throughout the district as an alternative to out-of-school suspension, and a break room for students working in the lab.

 

Protective wall

Due to the numerous crashes that have occurred on the fence near the corner of Boyne Avenue and Fall Park Road, Boyne City Public Schools are looking into the possibility of erecting a concrete safety wall.

“There would be a series of six 24-foot walls along that south end of the football field,” said Boyne City Public Schools Superintendent Peter Moss. “They would stick up about 24 inches … reinforced with steel bars.”

Estimates on the project run from $15,000 to $20,000.

“We’re trying to make the facing fit in with the campus overall block,” Moss said. “I think we’ve got a pretty good solution.”

Concerns over people sitting on the proposed safety wall ensued, and the board discussed the possibility of erecting concrete-filled steel pipes instead.

The board decided to have the matter looked into further before making a decision on the issue.