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Winter – 1211 A.D.

Provided by: Michigan NewsWire

If you had lived in Michigan in A.D. 1211, would you have been able to endure the winter? Visitors to the Michigan Historical Museum on Oct. 8 can explore the lives of the people who lived in Michigan long before Europeans visited the Great Lakes. This event is the second weekend of History Beneath Your Feet, a series of archaeology-themed programs at the museum sponsored by the Michigan State Housing Development Authority, State Historic Preservation Office.

Oct. 8 at 1 p.m.
Underwater Archaeology with John O’Shea: Thousands of years ago, after the glaciers receded but before Michigan looked like it does today, a narrow land bridge crossed present-day Lake Huron. Did Native Americans use the area as hunting grounds? Dr. O’Shea of the University of Michigan shares the underwater research he and his team have done to unravel the mystery.

Oct. 8 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
A Year in the Life of a Michigan Family, AD 1211: Learn about the skills it took to thrive in Michigan’s woodland forests and lakes and how new neighbors brought opportunities for trade 800 years ago. Explore what Michigan families wore, the tools they used, what they ate, and where they slept.

The History Beneath Your Feet Series, celebrating Archaeology Month, continues at the museum on Oct. 15, 22 and Nov. 5. Presentations include a look at artifacts found near the Beaumont Tower at Michigan State University and in downtown Flint. Family-friendly activities round out the series, with tool-making demonstrations, rubbings of rock carvings and a junior archaeologist workshop. Visit www.michigan.gov/museum and click on “View All Events” for more detailed information on the series.

While at the museum, be sure to stop at the first-floor exhibits gallery where the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War continues with the Plowshares Into Swords special exhibit.

Michigan Historical Museum admission is $6 for adults 18-64. Children through age 5 are free; youth ages 6-17 pay an optional $2; and seniors 65 and up pay $4. Annual passes are available. Visit www.michigan.gov/museum for details.

The museum is open seven days a week. It is located inside the Michigan Library and Historical Center, 702 West Kalamazoo St., Lansing. The museum and visitor parking are on the north side of Kalamazoo Street, two blocks east of M. L. King Jr. Boulevard. Weekend parking is free. For more information, visit www.michigan.gov/museum or call 517-373-3559.

The Michigan Historical Center is part of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Its museum and archival programs help people discover, enjoy and find inspiration in their heritage. It includes the Michigan Historical Museum, 10 regional museums, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Underwater Preserve, and the Archives of Michigan. Learn more at www.michigan.gov/michiganhistory.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state’s natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

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